Benefits of EMI/RFI Shielding in PCB SMD Assembly

Shielding in PCB SMD Assembly

Electromagnetic interference (EMI) is energy transmitted through radiation or conduction from one electronic component to another, and it can degrade or even stop your circuit board from functioning properly. It can be caused by radios, motors, and other devices that produce unwanted or undesirable electromagnetic energy, as well as by your circuit board’s own internal signals. You can mitigate this problem by using EMI/RFI shielding in your pcb smd assembly.

EMI shielding is a conductive enclosure that forms a Faraday cage around your electronics, which can block external electromagnetic interference and prevent it from interfering with other components. Shielding can also help reduce noise and crosstalk between traces on the PCB, which are both common causes of signal degradation and failure in electronic devices. This type of shielding is typically used in conjunction with other EMI mitigation techniques, such as decoupling capacitors and sufficient trace spacing.

In addition to shielding, EMI/RFI reduction techniques include the use of power-ground planes and an impedance-matched signal path. Choosing the right copper layer is important, as is using a solid or cross-hatched plank linked to the ground plane via stretched vias. Solid copper layers provide a higher degree of shielding than cross-hatched ones. However, they are a lot thicker and may affect your PCB’s flexibility.

Other EMI/RFI reduction techniques include minimizing the rate of current change, since faster changes cause more emissions. You should also minimize the rise times on your traces, as these can cause high-frequency noise. You can also use a small, densely packed layout to keep RF emission sources away from each other.

Benefits of EMI/RFI Shielding in PCB SMD Assembly

Adding an EMI/RFI shield to your pcb can improve its functionality, but you should only do so if your design meets the required EMI/EMC standards. Otherwise, you might be subject to a hefty fine or even product recalls.

A telecommunications company experienced data transmission problems due to crosstalk in their PCBs, but increased trace spacing and shielding solved the issue. They were able to get their products back on the market, and their customers were happy with their new, improved electronics.

You can find different types of EMI/RFI shields for your PCBs, including a flex-circuit style. Unlike conventional printed circuit boards, flex-circuits have flexible copper layers that can bend and conform to the shape of your device. This allows for more accurate placement of through-hole and surface-mount parts. In addition, a hybrid model can have a mix of SMD and through-hole components and uses design for manufacturability (DFM) to create a more streamlined assembly process.

This can help you save on costs and time while achieving the same performance as a traditional PCB. This is a good option for smaller electronic products that need to be light and portable. It can be a challenge to solder and unsolder these SMDs, so you’ll need to choose an SMT assembler with the proper equipment and trained operators. This will help ensure that your pcbs are built correctly and are compatible with your other electronics.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1